Colin Harrison's online learning blog
Thoughtboxes

Thoughtboxes: Organize in Style (via Mashable’s Twitter feed)


Quick Pitch: Thoughtboxes is a simple and stylish way to organize everything you do.

Genius Idea: An elegant twist on online to-do lists.

Mashable’s Take: To-do list applications abound on web and mobile, but Thoughtboxes’ super simple approach will appeal to those looking for a fast and easy way to build lists that are visible a single screen.

Thoughtboxes allows you to organize lists by “trains of thought,” which are essentially topic or project pages. Add boxes to your trains of thoughts, tasks to your boxes and invite friends to chip in with the planning and organization process. You can also manage, move around and color-code boxes, as well as star important tasks.

The free version comes with three trains of thought, but you can upgrade to the paid version for unlimited trains of thought and access to the group features.

htm2pdf is a really useful site, if you want to turn a website, or blog, in to a pdf. This can be useful if you want to show somebody a site in printed format, or want a record of what sections of your blog look like over time. 

url2jpg does the same thing, except it turns your URL into a .jpg image. Simple, fast, easy, free.

Thank you again, kbkonnected

untanglingtheweb:

pdf of a research study looking at how the “global” youth culture marketing segment is actually a local phenomenon, and therefore youth culture is not so global after all.

Kjeldgaard, D. & Askegaard, S. (2006, Sept). The Glocalization of Youth Culture: The Global Youth Segment as Structures of Common Difference. Journal of Consumer Research, Vol 33: 231-247.

abstract:

In this article we present an analysis of global youth cultural consumption based on a multisited empirical study of young consumers in Denmark and Greenland. We treat youth culture as a market ideology by tracing the emergence of youth culture in relation to marketing and how the ideology has glocalized. This trans-national market ideology is manifested in the glocalization of three structures of common difference that organize our data: identity, center-periphery, and reference to youth cultural consumption styles. Our study goes beyond accounts of global homogenization and local appropriation by showing the glocal structural commonalities in diverse manifestations of youth culture.

a couple of notes:

* use the web to draw together resources from global culture in order to identify with an aspired lifestyle that’s not present locally

* makes the experience more globally oriented

* the internet plays a more important role than TV in providing symbolic imagery of a central identity for youth (particularly when artifacts and expressions of that identity aren’t available locally)

* the web offers a space for “deterritorialized communities of peers” (p. 243): perceptions of greater similarity with people far away

WOW! Check out Web2.0 Cool Tools for Schools

Some great links on this site….

What Does it Mean to Integrate Technology Into the Classroom?

Mrs Brogley knows!

http://mrsbrogley.com/blog/

kbkonnected:

Current is a private daily diary where you write your text with 140 characters or less similar to Twitter.
#elemchat #spedchat
I discovered this on iLearn Technology and you can read more about it there. Kelly Tenkely shares some great ways for integrating it into  classrooms. She has some fantastic ideas.  Kelly also offers 2 suggestions for students who do not have e-mail accounts to access Current using @tempinbox or @mailinator.
I think is a fabulous tool, especially for classrooms without blogs. It’s a great way for a classroom to document what is happening in their classroom. Would be fun to read back at different times of the year.
This also might be a good tool to record quick daily anectdotals.

kbkonnected:

Current is a private daily diary where you write your text with 140 characters or less similar to Twitter.

#elemchat #spedchat

I discovered this on iLearn Technology and you can read more about it there. Kelly Tenkely shares some great ways for integrating it into  classrooms. She has some fantastic ideas.  Kelly also offers 2 suggestions for students who do not have e-mail accounts to access Current using @tempinbox or @mailinator.

I think is a fabulous tool, especially for classrooms without blogs. It’s a great way for a classroom to document what is happening in their classroom. Would be fun to read back at different times of the year.

This also might be a good tool to record quick daily anectdotals.

What a teaching resource!
An interactive map leads to 10,000 online newspapers, dozens in French, hundreds in Spanish! And all translated with a click….
kbkonnected:

Newspaper Map…Choose a newspaper from around the globe and have it translated in to the language of your choice.
#sschat #elemchat #spedchat
Added to  Countries for Kids

What a teaching resource!

An interactive map leads to 10,000 online newspapers, dozens in French, hundreds in Spanish! And all translated with a click….

kbkonnected:

Newspaper Map…Choose a newspaper from around the globe and have it translated in to the language of your choice.

#sschat #elemchat #spedchat

Added to  Countries for Kids

Interactive notebook page

This teacher http://kbkonnected.tumblr.com uses her blog to share teaching ideas.

Check out this link that she has created to pages of good ideas on creating interactive notebooks in the classroom:  http://www.teacherweb.com/SC/LadysIslandMiddleSchool/Gannon/ap6.stm

What do you think is the best way to deal with the increasing number of under 13s using social networks like Facebook?

Thanks for your question

I’ve co-authored a paper on Internet safety:

Sharples, M., Graber, R., Harrison, C. & Logan, K. (2009) E-Safety and Web2.0 for children aged 11-16. Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning, 25, 70-84.

I also like these rules, which are written in child-friendly language

(from this site: http://www.safekids.com/kids-rules-for-online-safety/)

Kids Rules for Online Safety (for pre-teens)

1.   I will not give out personal information such as my address, telephone number, parents’ work address/telephone number, or the name and location of my school without my parents’ permission.*
 
2.   I will tell my parents right away if I come across any information that makes me feel uncomfortable.
 
3.   I will never agree to get together with someone I “meet” online without first checking with my parents. If my parents agree to the meeting, I will be sure that it is in a public place and bring my mother or father along.
 
4.   I will never send a person my picture or anything else without first checking with my parents.*
 
5.   I will not respond to any messages that are mean or in any way make me feel uncomfortable. It is not my fault if I get a message like that. If I do I will tell my parents right away so that they can contact the service provider.
 
6.   I will talk with my parents so that we can set up rules for going online. We will decide upon the time of day that I can be online, the length of time I can be online and appropriate areas for me to visit. I will not access other areas or break these rules without their permission.
 
7.   I will not give out my Internet password to anyone (even my best friends) other than my parents.
 
8.   I will check with my parents before downloading or installing software or doing anything that could possibly hurt our computer or jeopardize my family’s privacy*
 
9.   I will be a good online citizen and not do anything that hurts other people or is against the law.
 
10. I will help my parents understand how to have fun and learn things online and teach them things about the Internet, computers and other technology.

WHAT IS YOUR EARLIEST HUMAN MEMORY?

Being held by my legs and spun round by an older kid when I was about 3 years old. I think he dropped me….