Colin Harrison's online learning blog
WOW! Check out Web2.0 Cool Tools for Schools

Some great links on this site….

What Does it Mean to Integrate Technology Into the Classroom?

Mrs Brogley knows!

http://mrsbrogley.com/blog/

kbkonnected:

Current is a private daily diary where you write your text with 140 characters or less similar to Twitter.
#elemchat #spedchat
I discovered this on iLearn Technology and you can read more about it there. Kelly Tenkely shares some great ways for integrating it into  classrooms. She has some fantastic ideas.  Kelly also offers 2 suggestions for students who do not have e-mail accounts to access Current using @tempinbox or @mailinator.
I think is a fabulous tool, especially for classrooms without blogs. It’s a great way for a classroom to document what is happening in their classroom. Would be fun to read back at different times of the year.
This also might be a good tool to record quick daily anectdotals.

kbkonnected:

Current is a private daily diary where you write your text with 140 characters or less similar to Twitter.

#elemchat #spedchat

I discovered this on iLearn Technology and you can read more about it there. Kelly Tenkely shares some great ways for integrating it into  classrooms. She has some fantastic ideas.  Kelly also offers 2 suggestions for students who do not have e-mail accounts to access Current using @tempinbox or @mailinator.

I think is a fabulous tool, especially for classrooms without blogs. It’s a great way for a classroom to document what is happening in their classroom. Would be fun to read back at different times of the year.

This also might be a good tool to record quick daily anectdotals.

What a teaching resource!
An interactive map leads to 10,000 online newspapers, dozens in French, hundreds in Spanish! And all translated with a click….
kbkonnected:

Newspaper Map…Choose a newspaper from around the globe and have it translated in to the language of your choice.
#sschat #elemchat #spedchat
Added to  Countries for Kids

What a teaching resource!

An interactive map leads to 10,000 online newspapers, dozens in French, hundreds in Spanish! And all translated with a click….

kbkonnected:

Newspaper Map…Choose a newspaper from around the globe and have it translated in to the language of your choice.

#sschat #elemchat #spedchat

Added to  Countries for Kids

Interactive notebook page

This teacher http://kbkonnected.tumblr.com uses her blog to share teaching ideas.

Check out this link that she has created to pages of good ideas on creating interactive notebooks in the classroom:  http://www.teacherweb.com/SC/LadysIslandMiddleSchool/Gannon/ap6.stm

What do you think is the best way to deal with the increasing number of under 13s using social networks like Facebook?

Thanks for your question

I’ve co-authored a paper on Internet safety:

Sharples, M., Graber, R., Harrison, C. & Logan, K. (2009) E-Safety and Web2.0 for children aged 11-16. Journal of Computer-Assisted Learning, 25, 70-84.

I also like these rules, which are written in child-friendly language

(from this site: http://www.safekids.com/kids-rules-for-online-safety/)

Kids Rules for Online Safety (for pre-teens)

1.   I will not give out personal information such as my address, telephone number, parents’ work address/telephone number, or the name and location of my school without my parents’ permission.*
 
2.   I will tell my parents right away if I come across any information that makes me feel uncomfortable.
 
3.   I will never agree to get together with someone I “meet” online without first checking with my parents. If my parents agree to the meeting, I will be sure that it is in a public place and bring my mother or father along.
 
4.   I will never send a person my picture or anything else without first checking with my parents.*
 
5.   I will not respond to any messages that are mean or in any way make me feel uncomfortable. It is not my fault if I get a message like that. If I do I will tell my parents right away so that they can contact the service provider.
 
6.   I will talk with my parents so that we can set up rules for going online. We will decide upon the time of day that I can be online, the length of time I can be online and appropriate areas for me to visit. I will not access other areas or break these rules without their permission.
 
7.   I will not give out my Internet password to anyone (even my best friends) other than my parents.
 
8.   I will check with my parents before downloading or installing software or doing anything that could possibly hurt our computer or jeopardize my family’s privacy*
 
9.   I will be a good online citizen and not do anything that hurts other people or is against the law.
 
10. I will help my parents understand how to have fun and learn things online and teach them things about the Internet, computers and other technology.

WHAT IS YOUR EARLIEST HUMAN MEMORY?

Being held by my legs and spun round by an older kid when I was about 3 years old. I think he dropped me….

Evernote home page

Evernote is currently my best bet for an electronic Commonplace Book.

It does what it says on tin: “Capture anything; Access anywhere; Find things fast”.

I access my Evernote account from my iPhone, iMac (home office), MacBookAir and Dell desktop (running Windows XP in my work office). I particularly value the instant cross-platform updates of everything from voice notes, iPhone photos of scribbled notes, and the most impressive tool of all- the capability to search text that include what Evernote has automatically located and scanned from photos or screen-captures. 

I love Jenn Vargas’s characterisation of Evernote as her ‘inspiration museum’.

Wiki vs Blog

Blogs and wikis serve different purposes:

- I think of a blog as an ongoing reflective journal, connected to other reflective journals

- I think of a wiki as a collective, a socially-constructed live wall of post-its

So I don’t necessarily agree with the pro-wiki perspective of this link….

What are the best ways to help highly motivated adults to learn online?

Commonplace book

The students on the University of Nottingham Post-Graduate Certificate of Educationinternational course (PGCEi) come from all over the world (Africa, the Caribbean, the Middle East, Spain, Malaysia and China). The course is taught partly face-to-face, but mostly online, and as we all know, online learning can be a very lonely business.

The staff who run the course want to encourage the students to participate in more social networking, forming small (or large) learning communities, engaging in peer-to-peer mentoring, sharing video and multimedia learning diaries, and so on.

My reason for setting up this blog is to offer an example of the ways in which a blog can both chronicle and extend a person’s learning. So I shall add thoughts, links and resources to it over the coming months, and shall welcome the thoughts, links and reflections of others.